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You must have a )] TJ ET BT 61.016 504.484 Td 0.000 Tw /F3 9.0 Tf [(strong password to keep your personal life personal, and not become a victim of identity theft.)] TJ ET 0.400 0.400 0.400 RG 85.866 487.311 m 85.866 487.723 85.696 488.133 85.404 488.425 c 85.113 488.716 84.703 488.886 84.291 488.886 c 83.878 488.886 83.469 488.716 83.177 488.425 c 82.885 488.133 82.716 487.723 82.716 487.311 c 82.716 486.899 82.885 486.489 83.177 486.197 c 83.469 485.906 83.878 485.736 84.291 485.736 c 84.703 485.736 85.113 485.906 85.404 486.197 c 85.696 486.489 85.866 486.899 85.866 487.311 c f BT 91.016 484.495 Td 1.403 Tw /F3 9.0 Tf [(Using email or your profile on Facebook, Whatsapp or Google, hackers can and do, extract a huge amount of )] TJ ET BT 91.016 473.506 Td 0.000 Tw /F3 9.0 Tf [(personal data of your personal "online" life.)] TJ ET 85.866 465.333 m 85.866 465.745 85.696 466.155 85.404 466.447 c 85.113 466.738 84.703 466.908 84.291 466.908 c 83.878 466.908 83.469 466.738 83.177 466.447 c 82.885 466.155 82.716 465.745 82.716 465.333 c 82.716 464.921 82.885 464.511 83.177 464.219 c 83.469 463.928 83.878 463.758 84.291 463.758 c 84.703 463.758 85.113 463.928 85.404 464.219 c 85.696 464.511 85.866 464.921 85.866 465.333 c f BT 91.016 462.517 Td 0.513 Tw /F3 9.0 Tf [(If you use the same password for multiple online accounts, you run the risk, if this password is hacked, of all your )] TJ ET BT 91.016 451.528 Td 0.000 Tw /F3 9.0 Tf [(online accounts being compromised.)] TJ ET 85.866 443.355 m 85.866 443.767 85.696 444.177 85.404 444.469 c 85.113 444.760 84.703 444.930 84.291 444.930 c 83.878 444.930 83.469 444.760 83.177 444.469 c 82.885 444.177 82.716 443.767 82.716 443.355 c 82.716 442.943 82.885 442.533 83.177 442.241 c 83.469 441.950 83.878 441.780 84.291 441.780 c 84.703 441.780 85.113 441.950 85.404 442.241 c 85.696 442.533 85.866 442.943 85.866 443.355 c f BT 91.016 440.539 Td 0.739 Tw /F3 9.0 Tf [(Using a personal name for an online account, the name of the city that you live in, the names of your children or )] TJ ET BT 91.016 429.550 Td 0.000 Tw /F3 9.0 Tf [(your date of birth, give hackers vital clues for attempting to access your personal data.)] TJ ET 85.866 421.377 m 85.866 421.789 85.696 422.199 85.404 422.491 c 85.113 422.782 84.703 422.952 84.291 422.952 c 83.878 422.952 83.469 422.782 83.177 422.491 c 82.885 422.199 82.716 421.789 82.716 421.377 c 82.716 420.965 82.885 420.555 83.177 420.263 c 83.469 419.972 83.878 419.802 84.291 419.802 c 84.703 419.802 85.113 419.972 85.404 420.263 c 85.696 420.555 85.866 420.965 85.866 421.377 c f BT 91.016 418.561 Td 1.239 Tw /F3 9.0 Tf [(For an average expert hacker, it is always easy to find passwords that are made up of words from the English )] TJ ET BT 91.016 407.572 Td 0.000 Tw /F3 9.0 Tf [(vocabulary or other languages, using a basic technique called "brute force" or "dictionary" attacks.)] TJ ET BT 61.016 384.613 Td /F4 9.0 Tf [(What makes a password safe?)] TJ ET BT 78.360 364.640 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(1.)] TJ ET BT 91.016 364.624 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(A password at least 8 characters long.)] TJ ET BT 78.360 353.651 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(2.)] TJ ET BT 91.016 353.635 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(The password does not contain information that is easy to find online, such as the date of birth, the telephone )] TJ ET BT 91.016 342.646 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(number, your spouses name, the name of a pet, or a childs name.)] TJ ET BT 78.360 331.673 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(3.)] TJ ET BT 91.016 331.657 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(The password does not contain words found in the dictionary.)] TJ ET BT 78.360 320.684 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(4.)] TJ ET BT 91.016 320.668 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(The password contains special characters like @ # $% ^ &, and numbers.)] TJ ET BT 78.360 309.695 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(5.)] TJ ET BT 91.016 309.679 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(The password uses a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters.)] TJ ET BT 61.016 286.720 Td /F4 9.0 Tf [(A trick that the experts use to create secure passwords:)] TJ ET BT 61.016 266.731 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(Think of a phrase and use the first letters of the words in the phrase.)] TJ ET 85.866 249.558 m 85.866 249.970 85.696 250.380 85.404 250.672 c 85.113 250.963 84.703 251.133 84.291 251.133 c 83.878 251.133 83.469 250.963 83.177 250.672 c 82.885 250.380 82.716 249.970 82.716 249.558 c 82.716 249.146 82.885 248.736 83.177 248.444 c 83.469 248.153 83.878 247.983 84.291 247.983 c 84.703 247.983 85.113 248.153 85.404 248.444 c 85.696 248.736 85.866 249.146 85.866 249.558 c f BT 91.016 246.742 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(For example: )] TJ ET BT 146.033 246.742 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [("In South Africa, a barbecue is called a Braai!")] TJ ET 85.866 238.569 m 85.866 238.981 85.696 239.391 85.404 239.683 c 85.113 239.974 84.703 240.144 84.291 240.144 c 83.878 240.144 83.469 239.974 83.177 239.683 c 82.885 239.391 82.716 238.981 82.716 238.569 c 82.716 238.157 82.885 237.747 83.177 237.455 c 83.469 237.164 83.878 236.994 84.291 236.994 c 84.703 236.994 85.113 237.164 85.404 237.455 c 85.696 237.747 85.866 238.157 85.866 238.569 c f BT 91.016 235.753 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(Take the first letters of each word and the password that is created is )] TJ ET BT 368.144 235.753 Td /F4 9.0 Tf [(ISAabicaB!)] TJ ET 85.866 227.580 m 85.866 227.992 85.696 228.402 85.404 228.694 c 85.113 228.985 84.703 229.155 84.291 229.155 c 83.878 229.155 83.469 228.985 83.177 228.694 c 82.885 228.402 82.716 227.992 82.716 227.580 c 82.716 227.168 82.885 226.758 83.177 226.466 c 83.469 226.175 83.878 226.005 84.291 226.005 c 84.703 226.005 85.113 226.175 85.404 226.466 c 85.696 226.758 85.866 227.168 85.866 227.580 c f BT 91.016 224.764 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(This will be very difficult to guess, but easy to remember.)] TJ ET 85.866 216.591 m 85.866 217.003 85.696 217.413 85.404 217.705 c 85.113 217.996 84.703 218.166 84.291 218.166 c 83.878 218.166 83.469 217.996 83.177 217.705 c 82.885 217.413 82.716 217.003 82.716 216.591 c 82.716 216.179 82.885 215.769 83.177 215.477 c 83.469 215.186 83.878 215.016 84.291 215.016 c 84.703 215.016 85.113 215.186 85.404 215.477 c 85.696 215.769 85.866 216.179 85.866 216.591 c f BT 91.016 213.775 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(At this point, you can decide to make your the Google password is )] TJ ET BT 357.146 213.775 Td /F4 9.0 Tf [(ISAabicaB!-G)] TJ ET BT 414.656 213.775 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(, and Facebook )] TJ ET BT 481.697 213.775 Td /F4 9.0 Tf [(ISAabicaB!-F)] TJ ET BT 91.016 202.786 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(and your university account )] TJ ET BT 205.568 202.786 Td /F4 9.0 Tf [(ISAabicaB!-U)] TJ ET BT 262.574 202.786 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(S and so on.)] TJ ET 85.866 194.613 m 85.866 195.025 85.696 195.435 85.404 195.727 c 85.113 196.018 84.703 196.188 84.291 196.188 c 83.878 196.188 83.469 196.018 83.177 195.727 c 82.885 195.435 82.716 195.025 82.716 194.613 c 82.716 194.201 82.885 193.791 83.177 193.499 c 83.469 193.208 83.878 193.038 84.291 193.038 c 84.703 193.038 85.113 193.208 85.404 193.499 c 85.696 193.791 85.866 194.201 85.866 194.613 c f BT 91.016 191.797 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(There is already a capital letter and a special character )] TJ ET BT 312.110 191.797 Td /F4 9.0 Tf [(\(!\))] TJ ET BT 321.101 191.797 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(, so you just need to add a number to finish off a good )] TJ ET BT 91.016 180.808 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(password like )] TJ ET BT 148.031 180.808 Td /F4 9.0 Tf [(9-ISAabicaB!-US)] TJ ET BT 221.543 180.808 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(\(9 could be the month you created the password in - for example\))] TJ ET BT 61.016 160.819 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(You will have already made your password a lot more difficult to hack, and it can be a lot of fun to create.)] TJ ET BT 61.016 142.330 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(Posted in:News,Phishing,Security,Tips | Tagged:Cyberaware,Cybersecurity,Password,Passwords,Phishing | With 0 )] TJ ET BT 61.016 131.341 Td /F3 9.0 Tf [(comments)] TJ ET q 225.000 0 0 135.000 61.016 420.242 cm /I1 Do Q endstream endobj 8 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F1 /BaseFont /Helvetica-Bold /Encoding /WinAnsiEncoding >> endobj 9 0 obj << /Type /Font /Subtype /Type1 /Name /F2 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Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Creating strong passwords

Tuesday, October 5th, 2021

Before we pointed out that most people underestimate the importance of having a secure password, and still make the mistake of using simple words and numbers as a password.

Keep in mind that your email and social network accounts contain very personal information about you. You must have a strong password to keep your personal life personal, and not become a victim of identity theft. 

  • Using email or your profile on Facebook, Whatsapp or Google, hackers can and do, extract a huge amount of personal data of your personal “online” life.
  • If you use the same password for multiple online accounts, you run the risk, if this password is hacked, of all your online accounts being compromised.
  • Using a personal name for an online account, the name of the city that you live in, the names of your children or your date of birth, give hackers vital clues for attempting to access your personal data.
  • For an average expert hacker, it is always easy to find passwords that are made up of words from the English vocabulary or other languages, using a basic technique called “brute force” or “dictionary” attacks.

What makes a password safe?

  1. A password at least 8 characters long.
  2. The password does not contain information that is easy to find online, such as the date of birth, the telephone number, your spouse’s name, the name of a pet, or a child’s name.
  3. The password does not contain words found in the dictionary.
  4. The password contains special characters like @ # $% ^ &, and numbers.
  5. The password uses a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters.

A trick that the experts use to create secure passwords:

Think of a phrase and use the first letters of the words in the phrase.

  • For example: “In South Africa, a barbecue is called a Braai!”
  • Take the first letters of each word and the password that is created is ISAabicaB!
  • This will be very difficult to guess, but easy to remember.
  • At this point, you can decide to make your the Google password is ISAabicaB!-G,  and Facebook ISAabicaB!-F and your university account  ISAabicaB!-US and so on.
  • There is already a capital letter and a special character (!), so you just need to add a number to finish off a good password like 9-ISAabicaB!-US (9 could be the month you created the password in – for example)

You will have already made your password a lot more difficult to hack, and it can be a lot of fun to create. 

Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Where do scammers get your information?

Friday, October 12th, 2018

In the last article, we provided you with a few tips on how to create strong passwords in order to make the hacker’s job harder at accessing your personal data. Using weak passwords is one way hackers and scammers get your information?”.

But where do scammers get your information?

The graphic below depicts the world where most of us find ourselves, and where scammers might obtain important snippets of our personal data that, in many cases, is there for the taking:

This is your world

Your personal information is in places beyond your control.

The cell phone has become an indispensable communications tool in the 21st century. According to the Pew Research Centre, South Africa is placed 24th on the world list with a smartphone usage of 37% of the total population. However, according to a recent global survey by McAfee and One Poll, 36% of those smartphone users have no form or password, pin or fingerprint protection on their devices. This means that if their phone falls into the wrong hands, they risk opening up all sorts of personal information such as bank details and online logins to whoever finds or steals the smartphone.

How much of your personal information have you placed out there on the internet?

  • Over 30% of South African Internet users share at least 3 pieces of personal information posted on their social media profiles that can make stealing their identity easy.
  • 60% of South African Internet users have revealed they had no idea what their privacy settings are and who could see their personal information on those sites.

Old-style junk mail, invoices, receipts and ordinary letters can still provide scammers with a wealth of information. Dumpster-diving can reveal documents with your ID Number, old bank statements with your account details, old credit cards, unwanted junk e-mail, payslips and tax forms. Even old prescriptions & medical aid claims can provide scammer with a wealth of information from your personal information.

The modern equivalent of a filing cabinet, a flash disk poses a huge risk to the security of your personal data. Flash disks are small and cheap and can often be forgotten plugged into computers, fall out of pockets and be stolen, providing scammers with all the data stored on that device.

Your bank, your employers and SARS all store and work with your personal information. You have placed a tremendous amount of trust in these organizations to keep your personal data safe. How many people at your bank, for instance, have access to your personal data, who can they potentially give that data to?

Your driver’s license has a lot of information on it, including fingerprints, date of birth and ID number. The new style “smart” licenses will hold even more information, and if the license gets into the wrong hands it can be used for identity theft. For instance, in order to open up a cell phone contract, you would need an ID document or driver’s license, bank account details and proof of address, almost all of which can be obtained by dumpster-diving or someone rifling through your paperwork.

Finally, your computer (at work or at home) or your laptop holds a huge amount of your personal information. If stolen, the hard-drives can easily be trawled for personal information. If there is no password or a weak password on the laptop it makes stealing this information much easier.

This is your world:

  • Since 2007, more money has been made from trafficking financial data acquired by identity theft, than money made from drug trafficking.
  • 8.8 million South Africans were victims of identity theft in 2015.
  • 1 in 3 South Africans do not have a password on their cellphones or computer.
  • 70% of South Africans change their passwords after being compromised. (So 30% of South Africans don’t do anything even after they have been compromised)
  • 1 in 3 South Africans admits sharing passwords with other people.

There are 4 areas where we all neglect the security of our personal information:

  1. IndifferenceLack of Feeling
  2. IgnoranceLack of Knowledge
  3. InabilityLack of Training or Education
  4. InactionLack of Respect

What can you do to improve your personal data security and to prevent identity theft?

When someone comes and knocks on your front door, do you just open the door and let them in? No, you check who it is and then you decide if you want to open your door to them or not. The power of access is in your hands because you control the door.

The same principle applies to your personal data. Be careful and vigilant and be the gatekeeper of your personal data! Control what data is given out and who receives it. You have the control!

Next time we will look at the modus operandi of identity thieves. 

 

 

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