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Technical guideline for assessments on SUNLearn

Monday, June 22nd, 2020

With almost all official examinations taking place on SUNLearn this year, the Centre of Learning Technologies and Academic IT have partnered up to provide lecturers with a guideline on the best way to set up assessments.

This guide has been shared with lecturers and so far, the +/- fifty exams happening each day have been well-run (touch wood for those pesky tech gremlins).

Download the guide in .pdf format

We are sure that our lecturers are learning at warp-speed these days and know that students appreciate this effort as well!

Learning Technology teams continue to work overtime

Monday, June 22nd, 2020

We recently shared some of the many projects that our Learning Technologies team and partners were working on in preparation for moving our Teaching and Learning online. We have continued to work long hours to try and ensure that teaching and assessment experiences for lecturers and students are as enjoyable as possible.

In the past two months we have begun and concluded many exciting projects while also working hard on strengthening the stability of SUNLearn in preparation for the exam period. With over 4000 queries received by the learnhelp service desk since March, we acknowledge the efforts that everyone has made in moving online, from the students to the support team.

Some of the highlights from our Learning Technology Systems department include:

  1. Integrating a number of textbooks from publishers into SUNLearn modules
  2. Working with the Science Faculty to launch and integrate a virtual laboratory into SUNLearn
  3. Activating a number of MS Teams for specific modules
  4. Launching the first phase of testing a Learning Analytics system linked to SUNLearn
  5. Expanding our service desk for SUNLearn and other learning technologies to run daily until 10pm and on Saturdays as well.

We thank you, our colleagues and students for your patience throughout this process as we continue to work towards creating the best learning environment online that we can.

[Article by Lianne Keiller – Manager: Learning Technology Systems]

Card access problems on campus

Tuesday, February 4th, 2020

Some students and staff might experience problems with card access on campus.

Due to a heavier load on the network in terms of traffic and potential technical glitches, card access is being denied at some doors.

The rights of valid and registered cards will automatically updated after they’ve been swiped and should work shortly afterwards. 

We realise that this is frustrating and inconvenient and are doing everything possible to address the problem. 

For further enquiries, please log a request on servicedesk.sun.ac.za.

New warning banner for your email

Tuesday, February 4th, 2020

The nature of cyber-attacks is always evolving and Information Technology, with the help of staff and students, has to do everything within our power to try and prevent them.

In an attempt to tighten cyber security on campus, we will soon provide a new warning which can identify the origin of an email. By establishing the origin of email, it’s easier to protect against cyber security risks such as malware, spoofing and phishing. 

From now on, every time you receive email from outside campus a yellow banner will be displayed at the top of your email:

Click for a larger image

 

Click for a larger version

When staff or students receive a potentially dangerous email which seems to have been sent from a colleague with a sun.ac.za address, they will immediately be able to see that it is, in fact, not from their colleague, but from an address outside the university.

Just keep in mind that the banner does not indicate that the email is necessarily a security risk, but that the possibility exists and that you need to be extra careful when responding to it.

We will continuously assess the effectiveness of this decision and reconsider if necessary. For any additional enquiries, please send an email to help@sun.ac.za.

Remember that movie you downloaded?

Monday, January 20th, 2020

With a fast internet connection and enough internet data, it’s possible to watch and download movies and series whenever you want. Unfortunately, it’s also not legal and everything you do online can be tracked and traced.  

Until recently television networks and film companies weren’t geared to trace and stop downloading and distribution of illegal movies. It was just too difficult and not cost-effective, however, this is no longer the case – even in South Africa. 

We frequently receive notifications from companies such as Warner Bros. and Columbia Pictures indicating that illegal, copyrighted material is being downloaded and seeded (distributed) from IP addresses within the university’s network. 

These emails include the specific IP address, the material downloaded and distributed and at which times. When we receive these notifications, we immediately send an email to the user of the address with a written warning. If they do not comply, these companies will take legal action.

The distribution or seeding of copyrighted material without a licence is both a criminal and civil offence in South Africa, even if distribution takes place from BitTorrent. Just because it’s available via a torrent, it doesn’t mean it’s legal.

In South Africa, under the Copyright Law of 1978, you can be sentenced for up to 5 years in prison and a fine of up to R10,000 for each item you distribute. Between 2010 and 2012, 200,000 people have been sued for uploading and downloading copyright material via BitTorrent.

So before you download the latest episode of your favourite series or stream movies from an illegal file sharing site, consider the consequences. There are many legal options to watch media online, from Netflix  to Showmax, so rather be safe and legal.

MORE INFORMATION:

How does BitTorrent and seeding work?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent 

http://www.bittorrent.com/help/guides/beginners-guide

 


Example of a warning letter:

We are writing this letter on behalf of Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. (“Rights Holder”) who own certain rights under copyright law in the title White House Down.

You are receiving this notice because your Internet account was identified as having been used recently to copy and/or distribute illegally the copyrighted motion pictures and/or television shows listed at the bottom of this notice. This notice provides you with the information you need in order to take immediate action that can prevent serious legal and other consequences. These actions include:

1. Stop downloading or uploading without authorization any motion pictures or TV shows owned or distributed by Rights Holder; and
2. Permanently delete from your computer(s) all unauthorized copies you may have already made of these movies and TV shows.
If this notice is being received by an Internet Service Provider (ISP), please forward the notice to the individual associated with the activities.
The unauthorized distribution or public performance of copyrighted works constitutes copyright infringement under the Copyright Act, Title 17 U.S Code Section 106(3)-(4). This conduct may also violate the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works and The Universal Copyright Convention, as well as bilateral treaties with other countries that allow for protection of Rights Holder copyrighted works even beyond U.S borders.
Below is the detail for your reference:
– ————- Infringement Details ———————————-
Title: White House Down
Timestamp: 2013-09-19T23:18:28Z
IP Address: 146.232.***.**
Port: *****
Type: BitTorrent
Torrent Hash: *************************************


 [SOURCE: http://mybroadband.co.za]

 

 

 

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