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Information Security Awareness Training

Tuesday, October 5th, 2021

Part of living in a connected world is understanding that our private information is more vulnerable. ID theft and data breaches are no longer isolated incidents, they happen every single day.

So why would a university be targeted?

Universities hold a great deal of information that could be exploited if it gets into the wrong hands. This information includes personal details and research data.

Consequences and why it matters:

Though not all data security incidents will lead to the loss or theft of information, they will expose information to unwanted risk.

A full data security breach will involve a known disclosure or inappropriate access to information, which is a more serious incident. Any data security incident could potentially be disastrous for both you and the institution.

In an effort to create awareness around some of the typical hacks that we all fall prey to, we have made an Information Security Awareness training programme available. This is a self-study programme with fun quizzes in-between. This is by no means a programme that you will need to have a pass record. This course is strictly informational so that you will have the necessary tools when it comes to Information Security.

To access the course, go to https://learn.sun.ac.za. When the SUNLearn main page opens, click on the “Information Security Awareness Training” link and log in with your network username and password. If you’re successfully logged in, scroll down and click on the “Enrol me” button to enrol yourself for the course and to access the training material.

If you are unable to log on to SUNLearn and you are certain that the network credentials you have entered are correct and active, please log a request via https://learnhelp.sun.ac.za for SUNLearn support.

 

 

 

 

 

Why is cyber security important?

Tuesday, October 5th, 2021

Cyber security is the skill and ability of protecting networks, devices, and data from unlawful access or criminal use and the practice of guaranteeing confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information.

Communication, transportation, shopping, and medicine are just some of the things that rely on computers systems and the Internet now. Much of your personal information is stored either on your computer, smartphone, tablet or possibly on someone else’s system. Knowing how to protect the information that you have stored is of high importance not just for an individual but for an organisation and those in it.

Did you know that:

  • As of 2021, there is a ransomware attack every 11 seconds, up from 39 seconds in 20191,2
  • 43% of cyber-attacks target of small businesses, and they have grown 400 percent since the outbreak began

More tips and resources can be found here

The US government’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency has made a collection of tip sheets available for use. These downloadable PDF documents contain all the information you need to protect yourself from cyber security risks in a convenient, compact format. 

More tips and resources can be found here

[SOURCE:  Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, United States Government

Extra layer of security added to campus computers

Monday, August 2nd, 2021

Cyber crime is a constantly evolving field. Even though the majority of viruses were created as pranks, it’s essential to stay informed of the various risks that exist on the internet if you want to stay safe online. Here’s a breakdown of the basics: 

Malware, or malicious software, is a catch-all term for any type of malicious computer program. Malware is the most common type of online threat.

Ransomware is an emerging form of malware that locks the user out of their files or their device, then demands an anonymous online payment to restore access.

Adware is a form of malware that hides on your device and serves you advertisements. Some adware also monitors your behaviour online so it can target you with specific ads.

Spyware is a form of malware that hides on your device, monitors your activity, and steals sensitive information like bank details and passwords.

The world of cyber crime is very similar to that of technology. Every year, new trends, breakthroughs, and tools emerge.

You’ve probably noticed a Malwarebytes Threat Scan icon on your desktop or laptop (Figure 1). Don’t worry, this isn’t a brand-new type of malware. Stellenbosch University’s IT department has added an extra layer of security to campus computers.

Figure 1

Malwarebytes Incident Response is the trusted standard in automated endpoint remediation. Unfortunately, with the current environment, some malware will return after removal and Malwarebytes will prompt you to initiate a restart (Figure 2).

Figure 2

This is because the malware will sync to your browsers profile and will be synced back to your device after it has been removed.  If you are experiencing such daily prompts for restarts by Malwarebytes, we suggest that you log a request on the ICT Partner Portal for a technician to assist with further remediation.

[ARTICLE BY BRADLEY VAN DER VENTER]

Microsoft Teams performance tips

Tuesday, July 6th, 2021

Many SU staff members have experienced lost connections during a Teams meeting or sometimes have technical glitches such as poor or broken voice connections. With this short article, we provide some tips to ensure that your next Teams meeting has minimum disruptions. The tips are split into three categories:

  1. Good practices
  2. Preparing for a trouble-free meeting
  3. Steps to take if you experience a poor connection

The good practices include:

  1. Regularly shut down and restart your PC – at least once a day. The shut down and restart cleans the PC of processes taking up resources. A good habit is to shut down at the end of the workday, and start fresh in the morning.
  2. Regularly run updates, ensuring that the operating system and applications are up to date. This should happen almost automatically on University owned PCs.
  3. Regularly run virus checks.

Preparing for a trouble-free meeting – especially important if you are the host or presenter for a meeting:

  1. Close all unnecessary applications.
  2. Test if you have sufficient Internet bandwidth available. You can do this by running an Internet bandwidth test at Speedtest by Ookla – The Global Broadband Speed Test.
    For voice only and sharing images you need less than one MB/second. For sharing applications and using your webcam, you need between 1 and 2 MB/s.
    For video you preferably need 2 MB/s.
  3. Test if your PC has sufficient resources.
    For Windows 10 press Ctrl + Shift + Esc.
    For a Mac the equivalent is the Activity Monitor: Press Command+Spacebar to get the Spotlight search field. 
    Start typing “Activity Monitor.”
    The CPU usage percentage should be under 50% and memory usage below 60% before you start MS Teams.
  4. If your MS Teams app was open before a meeting, quit and start MS Teams again at least 10 minutes before your meeting.
    To do this right click the Teams icon on the task bar and Quit, then start again.

5. If you share your Internet with other users (e.g. at home), ensure that the others know and do not hog the Internet connection. (e.g. do not play video, stream content, run updates).
Turn the camera off and use audio only if  the speed test or PC resources tests did show limitations.

6. If you are the host or presenter and have doubts about your Internet connection, rather work from your office on campus where you are unlikely to run into limitations. Use Ethernet (a cable connection to your router) rather than Wi-Fi if you have Ethernet available.

7. Have a second device with Microsoft Teams as a standby, e.g. a mobile phone with an LTE data connection. Practice switching devices so that you are familiar with how it works before you host a meeting.

Steps to take if you experience a poor connection:

  1. Turn the camera off if it was on.
  2. Turn off incoming video: (last item under the three dots menu).
    You will still be able to see shared screens and comments.

3. Switch to another device as a last resort, for example MS Teams on your mobile phone or tablet.

3 day online Excel course

Monday, May 3rd, 2021

Due to Covid restrictions training will still be hosted online through our training partner Stellietech.

The following course dates are available on Sun-e-hr for staff members to enrol.

10-12 May 2021
17-19 May 2021
5-7 June 2021
7-9 June 2021
2-4 August 2021

Should you be interested in attending you must please apply via the Sun-HR System by following the steps below:

>employee self-service
     >>training and development
             >>>learner home
                     >>>>Information Technology
                                >>>>>Online Excel course

COURSE OUTLINE:

Import Data and Navigate workbooks

  • Import Data from Text Files
  • Import Data from CSV Files
  • Search for Data
  • Navigate to workbook Elements

Format worksheets and workbooks

  • Modify Page Setup
  • Adjust Row Height and Column Width.
  • Customise Headers and Footers

Customise Options and Views

  • Customise the Quick Access Toolbar
  • Explore Workbook Views
  • Freeze Rows and Columns
  • Change Window View
  • Modify Basic Workbook Properties
  • Display Formulas

Configure Content for Collaboration.

  • Set a Print Area
  • Save in Alternative File Formats
  • Configure Print Settings
  • Inspect Workbook for Issues.

Manipulate Data in Worksheets

  • Use Special Paste Options
  • Use Autofill to Fill Cells
  • Insert and Delete Rows and Columns
  • Insert and Delete Cells

Format Cells and Ranges

  • Merge and Unmerge Cells
  • Alignment, Orientation, and Indentation
  • Use the Format Painter
  • Wrap Text Within Cells
  • Apply Number Formats

 

 

 

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