Month: November 2009

Cyber-criminals cash in on H1N1…

Cybercriminals are capitalizing on H1N1-flu fears by selling fake Tamiflu, so you probably shouldn’t be ordering this online. Networks of fraudsters use spam and malware to direct Web traffic to phony pharmaceutical sites. Although unwitting buyers do often receive some kind of drug as result of the transactional exchange, at best the drug doesn’t work and at worse it can pose serious health risks. These Internet criminals are putting their customers’ health, personal information and credit card details at risk, with these counterfeit versions of Tamiflu. Many of these fraudulent pharmaceutical sites originate in Russia . One network called...

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The Five Most Dangerous Security Myths: Myth #5

by Erik Larkin You’ve cleared away most of the web of myth. You know that today’s evil viruses and other malware exist to make money, that antivirus alone is no guarantee of safety, and that neither is your own good sense (as important as that is). And you know that some of the best protection comes from keeping your software and your operating system up-to-date. Now it’s time to make sure you don’t fall for the final and potentially worst myth: That the crooks own the Internet, and that the only good option is to use it as little...

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The Five Most Dangerous Security Myths: Myth #4

by Erik Larkin It’s a beloved phrase, used by the wise and the lazy alike in response to everything from potential construction to technical work: “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” I hear it plenty from people who’ve been bitten in the past after applying a recommended patch for a piece of software, only to see that software break or suddenly conflict with something else on the PC. After that kind of a hair-tearing experience, it’s a natural reaction to not want to mess with a setup that’s working and seemingly stable. But there’s just one problem. These...

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