New insights on risks associated with key stages in biological invasions
Percent of qualitative/semi-quantitative (a) and quantitative (b) risk assessments considering the different stages of the invasion process, split into models containing different numbers of TEASI components (Transport, Establishment, Abundance, Spread, Impact).

New insights on risks associated with key stages in biological invasions

The human-mediated movement of species around the world has added several layers of complexity to the management of ecosystems. Once alien species are established in a new region they are extremely difficult or impossible to eradicate, and control is expensive and often ineffective.

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Dispersal and spread of avian invaders
European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). [ Photo: Petr Kratochvil ]

Dispersal and spread of avian invaders

Following Charles Elton’s pioneering work, invasion ecology has grown into a mainstream research field focusing on the patterns and processes of human-mediated translocation of alien organisms. As probably the most iconic taxa in conservation, birds provide an ideal natural experiment to test many theories and hypotheses in invasion ecology.

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Conservation Biogeography of Antarctica
Fifteen Antarctic Biogeographic Regions delineated by comparing biologically distinct groups formed by the cluster analyses of environmental domains and expert-defined bioregions.

Conservation Biogeography of Antarctica

Most people think of Antarctica as completely covered in ice. Ice-free areas cover only 0.4 % of the total continental area and until relatively recently it was thought that most were barren and largely devoid of life.

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Is forestry with pines sustainable in fynbos areas?
Mountain catchment areas throughout the fynbos region are invaded by pines. Photo credits: DM Richardson

Is forestry with pines sustainable in fynbos areas?

It may no longer make economic or environmental sense to pursue forestry endeavours using conifers in the Western Cape. If local plantations are to be maintained, invasive pine trees will continue to spread, the Cape’s water supply will continue to dwindle and the unique natural diversity of the fynbos region will be changed forever.

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Continent-wide risk assessment for the establishment of alien species in Antarctica
A risk index, based on propagule pressure and origins, and the climatic suitability of the ice-free areas of the continent, indicated that alien species is currently most likely to establish in the Antarctic Peninsula and in western Ross Sea region. The map illustrates the relative risk of alien vascular plants establishing in Antarctica. Insets show risk index detail for the Antarctic Peninsula and the western Ross Sea.

Continent-wide risk assessment for the establishment of alien species in Antarctica

Antarctica is regarded as one of the most pristine environments on Earth. There is, however, a growing concern that the icy continent is being threatened by alien species that are accidentally being brought to the continent in the luggage of tourists and scientists.

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