Read more about the article Twenty years of alien plant management in South Africa reviewed
One of the Working for Water (WfW) teams and Professor Brian van Wilgen (on the left) at a clearing site at Clovelley.

Twenty years of alien plant management in South Africa reviewed

A study led by C·I·B Core Team member, Brian van Wilgen, found that clearing efforts by the Working for Water programme have only reached about 14% of the estimated invaded area in South Africa, and that alien plant invasions continued to grow when assessed at a national scale.

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C·I·B researcher awarded NRF Lifetime Achievement Award

C·I·B Core Team member, Brian van Wilgen, was recently awarded the National Research Foundation’s (NRF) Lifetime Achievement Award for his research contributions in the fields of ecology and biological invasions.

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Read more about the article Mapping of street trees help city prioritizes areas for greening
London Plane (Platanus × acerifolia Willd.) trees in the suburb of Kensington, Johannesburg, with disfigured trunks due to infestation by the polyphagous shot hole borer.

Mapping of street trees help city prioritizes areas for greening

A study by Prof Solomon Newete and colleagues from the C∙I∙B and the Agricultural Research Council will help the City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality to address the disparity in the urban green structure between the City’s poor and affluent suburbs.

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Read more about the article How a parasite can show us the movement of its frog host
A photo of The African Clawed Frog, Xenopus laevis (Photo credit: Louis du Preez)

How a parasite can show us the movement of its frog host

A study by former C∙I∙B student, Anneke Lincoln Schoeman, showed that genetic data from parasites can act as tags, revealing the translocation of their hosts.

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