Acacia seed banks can accumulate in the presence of biological control agents

A recent study by C.I.B PhD graduate Mathys Strydom (currently at the Academy of Environmental Leadership) found that annual seed input of invasive Australian Acacias is still high, despite the use of biological control agents.

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Human usage in the native range may determine future genetic structure of an invasion
Golden wattles, Acacia pycnantha, are native to Australia. This species, like many others wattles that are invasive in South Africa, has been historically introduced for agroforestry and dune reclamation purposes

Human usage in the native range may determine future genetic structure of an invasion

Quantifying the amount of genetic diversity and how it is distributed within and between populations (genetic structure) has become a major focus in invasion biology. Population genetic structure can be useful as a proxy for the introduction history of a species, e.g. to differentiate between multiple introductions vs. single introductions.

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National Geographic Society grant for legume research

Dr Jaco Le Roux, C·I·B core team member, was recently awarded a National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration grant to investigate the consequences of legume invasions on native legume biodiversity in South Africa’s Cape Floristic Region.

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