Read more about the article Innovative management protocol for PSHB based on citizen science
Priority monitoring areas (1km2 grid cells) based on polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) reproductive host density and their proximity to plant biomass sites for (a) all reproductive hosts, and (b) Acer negundo. Red = high priority, green = low priority. A visual survey of a high priority Acer negundo monitoring site identified in our protocol detected a new PSHB infestation outside a nursery (photo credit: LJ Potgieter, 18 February 2023). Data from iNaturalist (https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/reproductive-hosts-at-risk-of-pshb-in-south-africa and https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/acer-negundo-in-south-africa, Accessed 14 February 2023)

Innovative management protocol for PSHB based on citizen science

CIB researchers develop an innovative protocol to map priority areas for detecting new and expanding polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) infestations in urban areas.

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National symposium on biological invasions 2023

The Stellenbosch University Centre for Invasion Biology (C·I·B) and the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) are collaborating to host the National Symposium on Biological Invasions 2023.

Join us for the National Symposium on Biological Invasions 2023

The Stellenbosch University Centre for Invasion Biology (C·I·B) and the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) are collaborating to host the National Symposium on Biological Invasions 2023.

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Read more about the article Twenty years of alien plant management in South Africa reviewed
One of the Working for Water (WfW) teams and Professor Brian van Wilgen (on the left) at a clearing site at Clovelley.

Twenty years of alien plant management in South Africa reviewed

A study led by C·I·B Core Team member, Brian van Wilgen, found that clearing efforts by the Working for Water programme have only reached about 14% of the estimated invaded area in South Africa, and that alien plant invasions continued to grow when assessed at a national scale.

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