Australian acacias are genetically highly diverse across the globe
Invasive Sydney Golden Wattle (Acacia longifolia) invading areas in Pinheiro da Cruz, Setúbal district, Portugal (photo provided by Sara Vicente).

Australian acacias are genetically highly diverse across the globe

Australian acacias are some of the world’s worst invasive plants and their success has been heavily shaped through their usage by humans for various purposes. C·I·B Research Associate Prof Jaco Le Roux, Director Prof Dave Richardson and Core Team member Prof John Wilson, together with colleagues from the University of Lisbon in Portugal, recently published a meta-analysis in the journal Annals of Botany on the genetic diversity of 37 Australian Acacia species.

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Alien pest of wheat and maize could pose a threat to South Africa

Alien pests of agriculture cause billions of Rands’ worth of damage to South African crops every year. Knowledge on which pests could pose a threat in the future is vital to inform South Africa’s biosecurity.

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The status of alien bamboos in South Africa

Bamboos have caused widespread damaging invasions in many regions of the world. In South Africa, despite a long-history of introduction, little is known on the bamboo species currently present and their invasion history.

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Unscrambling the egg: resolving the introduction history for Silver wattle
Silver wattle (Acacia dealbata) invading along a river in Chile. (Photo credit: A. Pauchard)

Unscrambling the egg: resolving the introduction history for Silver wattle

Researchers at the Centre for Invasion Biology (C·I·B) at Stellenbosch University, found that the introduction histories of the globally important invasive tree Silver wattle (Acacia dealbata) are complex and cannot be generalized.

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Understanding Nassella invasions in South Africa
A paddock completely invaded by serrated tussock grass (Nassella trichotoma) on Boschberg near Somerset East in the Eastern Cape (Photo: Rohan Kruger).

Understanding Nassella invasions in South Africa

Urgent research is needed to guide more effective control measures for Nassella grass invasions in South Africa. This was the finding of an extensive literature review by C·I·B-funded PhD student Anthony Mapaura, with inputs from researchers at the Centre for Biological Control at Rhodes University and the University of the Free State’s Qwaqwa campus, and C·I·B Director Dave Richardson.

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