All the better to eat you with
The Cape kurper (Sandelia capensis), endemic to rivers of the Western Cape, South Africa, is threatened by the introduced fish species. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shelton)

All the better to eat you with

The morphological traits of invasive largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) are more specialised for preying on fish than native species counterparts. This was the finding of a collaborative project involving researchers from the University of Wageningen in the Netherlands and C∙I∙B members from the South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (SAIAB) and Stellenbosch University.

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Novel and disrupted trophic links following invasion in freshwater ecosystems
Mesocosms at Queen Mary University of London, UK (Photo by J Grey)

Novel and disrupted trophic links following invasion in freshwater ecosystems

Freshwater ecosystems are under threat from many stressors, including climate change, pollution, habitat destruction and the invasion of non-native species. These stressors can have direct impacts on individuals (e.g. survival, reproduction), populations (e.g. range, abundance) and communities (e.g. biodiversity, richness).

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Hybridisation, Competition and Predation: threats to one species of Xenopus from another
The small Cape platanna, Xenopus gilli, is Endangered in its small range in the Western Cape (Photo credit: John Measey)

Hybridisation, Competition and Predation: threats to one species of Xenopus from another

The most recent assessment suggests that the Cape platanna is Endangered, but that instead the decline being fuelled by habitat loss, it is now the threat from hybridisation, competition and predation by the African clawed frog.

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New protocol helps identify and categorise environmental impacts of alien species
The mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos) has massive impact through hybridisation. (Photo credit: By WPPilot - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38620499)

New protocol helps identify and categorise environmental impacts of alien species

A new protocol for identifying and categorising the environmental impacts of alien species may help invasion biologists to complete a global stocktake on the environmental impacts of all known alien species by 2020.

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Study shows invasive species can have cross-ecosystem impacts
The native fish species, the mountain catfish (Amphilius natalensis)

Study shows invasive species can have cross-ecosystem impacts

A recent study by C·I·B post-doctoral fellow, Michelle Jackson, found that invasive species can have effects that reach across different ecosystems.

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