Botanical gardens and biosecurity
Eight biosecurity hazards presented by botanical gardens and the opportunities they provide to improve management and communication. Materials going into the gardens such as seeds, tubers, cuttings, mulch, compost and soil could potentially transport and introduce pests to the gardens (a, d). On the other hand, materials leaving the gardens such as sold plants, prunings and dead plants can potentially transport pests established in the gardens to the external environment (b, h). Other activities of the gardens, including visits by local and international visitors (f), the use of machinery and equipment (e), and plant exchange between botanical gardens (c) may also serve as pathways of movement of pests to- and from the gardens. Additionally, pests may naturally disperse between managed estates of the gardens and the adjacent natural vegetation (g). (Graphic from Wondafrash et al. 2021)

Botanical gardens and biosecurity

A recent paper, led by Dr Mesfin Gossa and published in Biodiversity and Conservation, reviews the value as well as the hazards associated with botanical gardens for biosecurity at a global scale.

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Tackling Invasive Alien Species in Europe: the Top 20 Issues
Some of the invited speakers at the Freshwater Invasives: Networking for Strategy (FINS). Back row (left to right): Joe Caffrey (Inland Fisheries Ireland), Phil Hulme (Lincoln University, New Zealand), Olaf Weyl (SAIAB/CIB), Fergus O’Dowd (Minister of Fisheries Ireland), Hugh MacIsaac (University of Windsor, Canada), Anthony Ricciardi (McGill University, Canada). Front row: Toril Loennechen Moen (Norwegian Biodiversity Information Centre), Jarle Steinkjer (Directorate for Nature Management, Norway), Frances Williams (CABI, Kenya), Niall Moore (Non-native Species Secretariat for Great Britain), Helen Roy (Biological Records Centre, UK).

Tackling Invasive Alien Species in Europe: the Top 20 Issues

Globally, Invasive Alien Species (IAS) are considered to be one of the major threats to native biodiversity. In Europe, there are about 12,000 alien species, 11% of which are invasive, causing environmental, economic and social damage. Given Global trends, it is reasonable to expect that the rate of biological invasions into Europe will increase in the coming years.

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