C·I·B study finds that Port Jackson invasions impact soil long after removal
Mlungele Nsikani taking soil samples in dense stands of Port Jackson (Acacia saligna) (Photo credit: Nkoliso Magona)

C·I·B study finds that Port Jackson invasions impact soil long after removal

Native areas that are invaded by the invasive alien tree Port Jackson can experience soil legacies for up to 10 years after its removal. This was the finding of a recent study by a group of C·I·B researchers, led by C·I·B PhD student, Mlungele Nsikani.

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Eucalyptus invasions reduce bird diversity in a riparian habitat
Joy Mangachena performing fixed-point bird counts at near-pristine sites (uninvaded) and at sites invaded by Red river gum trees in riparian habitats. (Photo credit: Sjirk Geerts)

Eucalyptus invasions reduce bird diversity in a riparian habitat

The areas between land and a river or stream (riparian habitats) forms a small fraction of the landscape, but support a high diversity of birds. Invasion of these riparian areas by invasive alien plants can negatively affect bird groupings and the important services such as seed dispersal and pollination that birds provide in the ecosystem.

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Can we save South Africa from a Tamarix invasion?
Danica Marlin looking for Tamarisk beetles in a Tamarix infestation in Colorado, USA, May 2017. (Photo credit: Danica Marlin)

Can we save South Africa from a Tamarix invasion?

The South African biocontrol programme for invasive Tamarix  has begun,  with host-specificity testing of Tamarisk beetles. This news comes from a recent review article by Dr Danica Marlin, C·I·B Core Team Member Prof Marcus Byrne and colleagues, all from the University of the Witwatersrand.

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Should competition limit or favour species coexistence?

The theory about the mechanisms underlying the coexistence between species has been developed with a focus on interactions between pairs of species, often ignoring more complex and indirect interactions that can appear in competition networks.

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