Connecting ecosystem services, disservices and plant invasions
Hakea sericea is an example of an invasive plant providing both services and disservices. This shrub or small tree in the protea family is native to Australia and was introduced in Portugal for afforestation goals. It is currently used by local people in Portugal to provide fences (an ecosystem service), but it also causes physical injury to people (an ecosystem disservice) and reduces recreation opportunities (reduced ecosystem service). Photo credit: Joana Raquel Vicente.

Connecting ecosystem services, disservices and plant invasions

A paper published in the journal Ecosystem Services presents a new classification of ecosystem disservices and a framework for integrating ecosystem services and ecosystem disservices for human well-being linked to ecosystem functioning.

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Progress towards global networks in invasion science

An international team, including several C·I·B researchers, recently developed and published a framework for the establishment of global networks between researchers, policymakers, and practitioners in invasion science.

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Effects of invasive alien pine trees on lizard communities in fynbos
Elsje Schreuder in mountain fynbos with a Cape skink (Trachylepis capensis) (Photo credit: Sonja Schreuder)

Effects of invasive alien pine trees on lizard communities in fynbos

Invasions by alien pine trees (Pinus spp.) can have a negative impact on native lizard species by changing their native habitat, according to a recent C·I·B study published in Oecologia.

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