Australian redclaw crayfish quickly spreading in South Africa and Swaziland
High numbers of Australian redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) caught in a trap in South Africa (Photos by Ana Nunes)

Australian redclaw crayfish quickly spreading in South Africa and Swaziland

A recent study, led by C·I·B Post-doc Ana Nunes, confirms the presence of established and widespread populations of the Australian redclaw crayfish in South Africa and Swaziland.

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Hybridisation, Competition and Predation: threats to one species of Xenopus from another
The small Cape platanna, Xenopus gilli, is Endangered in its small range in the Western Cape (Photo credit: John Measey)

Hybridisation, Competition and Predation: threats to one species of Xenopus from another

The most recent assessment suggests that the Cape platanna is Endangered, but that instead the decline being fuelled by habitat loss, it is now the threat from hybridisation, competition and predation by the African clawed frog.

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Reducing the number of invasive species introduced through shipping
The authors found that more alien species with the potential to establish are likely to be introduced to Durban than to other South African ports. One such a species that is not yet in South Africa that could be introduced to Durban through high risk shipping routes, is the disease vector, the southern house mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus). (Photo credit: http://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/86848, Public Domain/released by CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) - Original photograph by James Gathany)

Reducing the number of invasive species introduced through shipping

Research conducted by C·I·B post-doctoral fellow Katelyn Faulkner demonstrates that to reduce invasions, ships travelling along high risk routes should be targeted for inspections.

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C·I·B student’s frog research wins prize for science communication

The Young Science Communicator’s Competition (YSCC) is an annual competition that challenges young scientists and researchers between the ages of 18 and 35 to communicate their research to a larger audience beyond the scientific community.

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C·I·B student wins first prize at the 2016/2017 Young Science Communicator’s Competition
The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis, is one of the world’s worst invasive insects. It can be distinguished from other ladybirds by the black ‘M’ or ‘W’ on its neck. The number of black spots on its body can vary from 0 to 20, and it can range in colour from light orange to dark red. It is between 0.5 and 1 cm in size. (Photo credit: Ingrid A. Minnaar)

C·I·B student wins first prize at the 2016/2017 Young Science Communicator’s Competition

A popular article about invasive ladybirds by C·I·B PhD student, Ingrid Minnaar, recently awarded her the first prize at SAASTA’s 2016/2017 Young Science Communicator’s Competition (YSCC).

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